Sunday, September 22, 2019

See the description Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

See the description - Essay Example As a start, it is important to define what is meant by stereotyping. A stereotype is the creation of a biased view or assumption about a certain ethnic, religious, or social group. In other words, an individual will take the behavior of one person and state that all people belonging to that particular group behave in the same manner.  The problem with stereotyping is that it encourages people to react and behave in a manner that is both judgmental and biased. The first common stereotyping inference people have about Moslems is that they are "extremists" and "terrorists". Moslems are seen as the most common source of terrorism and senseless violence. Besides, Moslems are also viewed as worshippers of an alien deity, who are intolerant of other religions and eager to use physical force to expand Islam. In addition, another negative assumption that people have about Islam is related to the Moslems view towards women. Most of the western world unjustly believes that Islam subjects women to harsh and demeaning discrimination and puts them in a status inferior to men. On the other hand, many western countries identify Moslems as persons who have many physical traits in common, concerning shape and dress. For instance, many people view Moslems as grim bearded men who wear robes and turbans. The negative image the West has about Moslems affect the way they treat Moslem residents in their lands. In many cases, Moslems in foreign countries suffer from extreme cases of discrimination and suppression. One of the Islamic practices that is fought and suppressed by the West is the veil of Moslem women. The veil or "Hijab" is the Islamic dress for females, which requires women to cover all their bodies, except their faces and hands. Moslem women are ordered by God to wear this kind of dress whenever they get out from their homes. So, the majority of Moslem women abides by this rule, and

Saturday, September 21, 2019

Taking Responsibility Essay Example for Free

Taking Responsibility Essay The ways in which individuals take responsibility for themselves and others Responsibility is a very strong word. Holding yourself accountable for your actions and others at the same time is not an easy task. It may seem easy, less painful or less demanding to not take responsibility for yourself. It’s more comfortable but there’s always a price to pay. When you don’t take responsibility for yourself or others that are important to you, you are giving away your personal power. It is extremely complicated for parents. Parents have to take accountability for themselves and their children. Mothers play a bigger role in taking care of us and shaping us into a grown individual. Mothers are more emotionally attached to their child. If their child does anything wrong, they always tend to blame their behavior on themselves and the way they have raised their children. Women forget to take in account their own self-interests; instead they worry about their family. This is perfectly portrayed in a short story by Budge Wilson called ‘The Leaving’. In this story, Elizabeth, a helpless wife, takes responsibility for the chauvinistic behavior of her children and her husband. In an attempt to change her lifestyle, Elizabeth stand up to her husband after 19 years; she showers her daughter with opportunities and tries to alter the behaviors of her sons and grandsons. Elizabeth lived a life of a typical suppressed housewife. She lived on a farm unaware of the outside world. She sat at home all her life trying to satisfy the needs of her husband, Lester and her 6 children. Elizabeth never got the appreciation she deserved, all she got was more and more duties which eventually became a burden in her life. Elizabeth’s outlook on her life started to alter when she read the book ‘The Feminine Mystique†. This book gave Elizabeth a lot of courage and hope that she is not alone in this world. The revelations of other women going through similar circumstances enlarged her thinking. This book gave her an incentive to step up and make a change in her life. Lester, Elizabeth’s husband never treated her as an equal human being. Elizabeth practically did all the work in the house starting from fetching eggs and water, cooking, washing clothes to cleaning the house. Lester always treated her like a servant and showed her no respect. Elizabeth finally got tired of Lester looking down at her like a peasant, so finally decided to stand up for herself. â€Å"My name,’ she repeated, this time more steadily, â€Å"is Elizabeth†. Elizabeth says this to  Lester when Lester calls her just a woman. She feels the need to let her husband know that she is not the old suppressed wife anymore. This strong comment explains the change in Elizabeth’s character and shows that she cannot be thrown around like a puppet. She turns from an isolated victim to a strong woman who can finally take responsibility and ownership on her life. Elizabeth is fully aware of the status of women in the house. Sylvie, Elizabeth’s daughter, is the only victim left after Elizabeth in the house. Elizabeth, as a mother wants to make sure that her daughter doesn’t go through the same problems that she encountered. Sylvie, as a second female in the house, had a lot more responsibilities in the house as compared to her brothers. Elizabeth always knew this at the back of her head but was waiting for the right time to show Sylvie her actual place which is why one day at 3 a.m, Elizabeth suddenly decided to go to Halifax with her daughter. â€Å"Where ya going, Ma?† I asked. She was standing beside my bed with her coat on. â€Å"Away†, said Ma. â€Å"And yer comin’ too†. This situation explains the sudden departure from the house. Moreover, Elizabeth wants Sylvie to have everything that she never got the chance to have. Elizabeth lived isolated from the rest of the world. Taking Sylvie to Halifax and showing her the world was Elizabeth’s way of showing her daughter, a new way of life. â€Å"Because yer the smartest,† she said. â€Å"And because yer a woman†. This phrase shows how Elizabeth enforces the fact that her daughter is the smartest out of all her children. Elizabeth shows her daughter the University of Halifax and dreams about her daughter studying in it one day. Elizabeth tries to set an example for Sylvie and show her a new pathway to life. She wanted Sylvie to think beyond the fields and fetching eggs, she wanted her to have a career and be a strong and successful woman. Elizabeth succeeds in moulding her daughter’s future and completes her task as a mother and most importantly, as a woman. Furthermore, Elizabeth takes accountability of her son’s behaviors. Elizabeth went away to Halifax thinking that something would change back home, but when she returned, nothing changed. â€Å"the way I sees it is y’ kin ask fer kindness or politeness from time t’ time. But y’ can’t expect no miracles. It’s my own fault fer raisin’ four boys like they was little men. I shoulda put them in front of a dishpan fifteen years ago.† This quote explains the misery Elizabeth is going through but instead of blaming the situation on the boys, she takes all the blame on herself. As a  Mother, Elizabeth feels guilty and questions the upbringing of her sons. Elizabeth emphasizes this idea of mothers raising their sons as ‘strong and brave with no soft edges’ but they often forget that men should be taught everything starting from cooking and cleaning to working. Men and woman should be treated equally so they can both be strong and build their life without any obstacles. In addition to that, Elizabeth tries to make up for her mistakes by teaching her grandsons how to wash dishes and make cookies. Elizabeth realizes that he made a mistake by not teaching her sons how to cook or clean, but she doesn’t want to repeat herself. Elizabeth steps up and takes responsibility of her grandsons by teaching them basic necessities in life. The Journey that Elizabeth sets forth for herself in this story is a portrayal of all the responsibilities she has taken in life. Elizabeth finally takes a step forward and talks back to her husband. She also tries her level best to open her daughter’s mind to all the opportunities that are present in this world. Furthermore, Elizabeth tries to change her grandson’s future by teaching them everything she failed to teach their fathers. Elizabeth is a perfect example for women who think they are helpless in this world. Elizabeth has proven that there is a way out of every problem in life. If one door closes, the other one opens. There are many possibilities and roads to take in life; one should just take the risk without worrying about the consequences. Instead of expecting a miracle, an individual should step up and make those miracles happen.

Friday, September 20, 2019

Effect of Life Events on Effective Leadership

Effect of Life Events on Effective Leadership Meers study is qualitative in nature. The purpose of his study was to explore how the selected leaders made sense of their experiences by understanding the context of the experiences themselves. It was imperative to the efficacy of his study to understand the perspectives of the leaders as they related their life experiences and what impact they saw these events having on their leadership development. As life experiences are best related in story format, it best served this study for the researcher to utilize personal interviews with participants as the primary method of data collection. The stories that leaders told about their formative life experiences cannot be broken down into easily manipulated variables, but rather must be understood as whole events that carry complex meanings for each individual. As Meers began his study, a theory was not presented for proving or dis-proving, however, in the process of data collection a theory did emerge. This is consistent with the qualitati ve approach and specifically the grounded theory method. Strauss and Corbin (1998) define grounded theory as: theory that was derived from data, systematically gathered and analyzed through the research process (pg. 12). The theoretical framework of how effective leaders learn from significant life experiences developed within this study matches this definition. The situation studied within this project was the significant life experiences of effective leaders with the process being leadership and the phenomenon being how these leaders learned from their respective significant experiences. The exploration of leaders life experiences moved from the specifics of each individuals stories to generalizations that can be applied to the broader area of leadership development. Purpose Statement The purpose of this study was to discover the role that significant life events played in the development of effective leaders. The use of the term significant in describing life events could sound somewhat limiting; however the intent of this study was for participants to define for themselves what a significant life event entails. Utilizing a semi-structured interview process, leaders perceived as being effective were interviewed to explore the meaning they made out of certain life experiences. Through analysis of this information the author attempted to discover common emerging themes which impacted their development. Problem Statements 1) What is leadership? and 2) How do leaders develop? or, From where do leaders come? Alignment of Research Question, Purpose Statement, and Problem Statement The author of this paper believes that the research questions, the purpose statement, and the problem statement are well aligned. First, based on the research question(s), it was critical for the researcher to provide a clear definition of leadership. In doing so, he was able to establish a foundation for his study. Meers study looked at effective leaders. It was critical for Meers to identify what an effective leader is. He did this through his review of literature and the identification of leadership based on a longitudinal study that included theory from numerous pioneers in the field of leadership and organizational studies. Meers also needed to research the foundations of leadership development. Most specifically, it was critical for him to include prior research theories of how a person becomes a leader and how a person develops and refines leadership skill and traits. Meers purpose statement effectively describes the research questions using concise language. Literature Used to Identify Gaps and Tensions within the Literature Meers dissertation includes a comprehensive literature review of prior studies. He began his review by defining leadership, which he accomplished through his own acquired knowledge. After defining leadership, the question (mentioned previously) that then arises is: How are leaders developed? Where do they come from? To answer these questions, Meers looked to the earlier work of Thomas Carlysle called the Great Man theory (Wren, 1995). Meers then addressed the transformation of leadership theory during the mid part of the twentieth century. He relied on the studies conducted by Conger (1992) and Fulmer (1997) who both studied the relationship between leaders and managers and whose work provided Meers with a clear distinction between management and leadership. Fulmers research regarding early leadership training provided Meers with an overview of where the field has been, where it was at the time of his research and where he saw it headed (Fulmer, 1997). The studies conducted by Burns (1978), Greenleaf (1970) and Kegan (1982) provided Meers with further information regarding the transformation of leadership theory. In his seminal work, Leadership, Burns (1978) proposed the idea that there were really two forms of leadership: transactional and transforming (or transformational). Burns (1978) work then encouraged others to begin to think of leadership as different from management, with leadership being much more focused on relationships with followers and particularly on influencing others to achieve common goals. For the purposes his study, Meers did not conduct a thorough analysis of servant leadership and transformational leadership, but instead focused on the impact the articulation and popularization of these forms of leadership have had upon the field of leadership training and development. He looked to the research of Greenleaf for this information. Kegans theory of moral development impacted the world of leadership training and development, mainly by introducing his idea of development. Meers was thorough in his choice to include the work of these three theorists. Meers longitudinal report ends with the contemporary work of Peter Senge (1990) who focused closely on the organization as a learning organization. Meers makes a nice transition from his section on the development of the organization to the actual experiences of leaders and managers and how emphasis has been placed upon learning from work experiences, specifically upon using these experiences as preparation for advancement to higher levels of management or leadership. Again, Meers cited the works of Senge (1990) and Kegan (1982), and also focused on the work of Robert E. Quinn (1996) who explored the importance of personal change in leading organizational change. To further establish the foundation for his area of study, Meers looked to the work of Ronald Heifetz of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University who brought forth the importance of learning from personal experiences and specifically how the reflection on certain experiences has become a part of some executive leadership education programs. A particular method that Heifetz developed and one he uses extensively in his courses at Harvard is the Case-in-point methodology in which students in the classroom bring their experiences to class and in essence become their own case studies (Parks, 2005). Also included in Meers literature review is the qualitative study conducted by Shamir, Dayan-Horesh and Adler (2005) in which they explored the life-stories that leaders tell. The purpose of their study was to extrapolate common themes in the leaders stories that may provide further insight into leadership development. Shamir, et al (2005) made the case that a leaders own story and even how he/she tells it has a strong impact upon how influential they are with their followers. Meers referred to the work of Avolio (1994) whose work, although ground breaking in the area of leadership development impacted by life experiences, was somewhat limited. The purpose of Avolios study was to explore the correlation between certain life experiences and to identify transformational leadership behaviors. Avolio (1994) selected the life experiences he was going to analyze. Meers stated in his dissertation that while this is a legitimate approach to a quantitative study, it limited the choices of the leaders in regard to which experiences they could identify as having impacted their development (Meers, 2009, p. 31). Yet another limitation to the study that Meers reported was in the more narrow focus on identified transformational leaders and especially upon specific transformational behaviors. Avolios study found some correlation between certain experiences and certain transformational leaders but it did not provide a great deal of insight into the general impact of life e vents or experiences upon leadership development (Avolio, 1994). Much like the work conducted by Avolio, Meers looked to a study completed by Bennis and Thomas (2002). Bennis and Thomas identified what they call crucible experiences which they define as those experiences that generally consisted of high stakes and often were tragic in nature. There were also gaps in this study. As with Avolioà ¢s (1994) study, the field was limited as the leaders interviewed seemed more inclined to talk about experiences that they perceived as having an impact directly upon their leadership development. Meers felt that this approach may not have told the complete story regarding development as the participants most likely automatically limited themselves in the experiences they selected as having impacts. Also, Meers felt that the researchers conducting this study failed to identify the meaning of leadership. Due to these limitations, Meers believed that there was room for further research to be conducted with defined leaders and how they perceived they had been impacted by their own significant life events.

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Case Study: Murder of Ashley Smith Essay -- Scott Jones, Frederick Joh

Introduction The purpose of this paper is to discuss and analyze the practices conducted by law enforcement during the investigation of the murder of Ashley Smith. The following pages will discuss the crime scene investigation, the evidence collection, the investigative steps following the initial crime scene investigation, the interviews of witnesses and suspects, and other strategies performed by the acting case investigators. Constitutional challenges have surfaced regarding specific pieces of critical evidence and a section of this paper will analyze the admissibility of this evidence. Lastly this case’s law enforcement processes will be contrasted with textbook processes in an effort to determine the validity of the case’s outcome. The Crime Scene On 11/3/00, two truck drivers discovered the deceased body of fourteen-year-old Ashley Smith in a wooded area behind the Pizza Hut, located on Old Annapolis Rd. Local authorities were dispatched and D/CPL. Glenn Case was designated as the primary investigator on the case. Upon arrival, D/CPL. Case observed that the medical examiner had already examined the body, evidence had been collected, photographs of the crime scene had been taken both on ground and from a helicopter (aerial view), and D/CPL. Case was advised that the victim had not yet been identified. The victim’s body had what appeared to be several stab wounds to her neck and abdominal area. D/CPL Case will later be advised by medical examiners that the victim had been stabbed thirty-four times and had also been manually strangled. The victim’s body was positioned with her head facing towards the Pizza Hut parking lot. The positioning coupled with bloody drag marks on the concrete suggested that the victim had been ... ...e resulted arrest of the suspects reflects this applicably. References Bond, J. (2007). Value of DNA Evidence in Detecting Crime. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 52(1), 128-136. Moston, S., & Engelberg, T. (2011). The Effects of Evidence on the Outcome of Interviews with Criminal Suspects. Police Practice & Research, 12(6), 518 - 526. State by State Compliance. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.vegress.com/index.php/can-i-record-calls-in-my-state Swanson, C. R., Chamelin, N. C., & Territo, L. (2012). Criminal investigation. New York: McGraw-Hill Higher Education. Technical Working Group on Crime Scene Investigation (2000). Crime Scene Investigation: A Guide for Law Enforcement-Research Report (NCJ 178280). Retrieved from U.S. Department of Justice website: http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/lab/forensic-science-communications/fsc/april2000/twgcsi.pdf

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

The Hebrew Exiles In Babylon Essay -- Hebrew History Historical Exiles

The Hebrew Exiles in Babylon   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  When Jerusalem fell to the conquering Babylonians in 587 BC, most of what was important to the Hebrew people was gone. They lost their holy city, the Temple was destroyed, and the Davidic monarchy ended (Beasley 221). Following the destruction of Jerusalem, the Babylonian king, Nebuchadrezzar, deported most of the population to other cities, including Babylon. These exiles remained there for about fifty years until the Persian forces, under king Cyrus, took the city of Babylon in 539 BC. The Persian policies concerning captured and exiled peoples were quite different than those of the Babylonians, and because of this King Cyrus allowed the exiles to return to Jerusalem in 538 BC to rebuild the city and the Temple. However, even though the exiles were allowed to return to their ancestral homeland of Judah, many of the people chose not to return but to remain in the recently conquered city of Babylon. There are many contributing factors concerning why these Hebrew exiles chose to remain. Even so, it is difficult to understand why a people, who were located in Palestine for over a millennium and who had such strong religious beliefs and practices, would choose to abandon the location of their now destroyed sacred Temple and ancestral home after being exiled for only fifty years. One contributing factor for the exile’s choice to remain in Babylon was the quality and level of social life that they experienced while in Babylon. Many of them maintained their identity and status within the Babylonian settlements. This suggests a well-developed social structure among the Hebrew exiles (Blenkinsopp 152). They also had the benefit of personal freedom and the ability to manage their own community life. An example of this are the â€Å"elders of the diaspora†, who aided the leader of the exiles, ex-king Jehoiachin, in conducting community affairs. The presence of elders among the Hebrew exiles suggests that the settlements within Babylon governed themselves similarly to pre-exilic urban existence, even to the point of maintaining gatherings for decisions and the hearing of prophets (Smith 97). The exiles were also allowed to live according to their own customs, were able to purchase property, and could even own slaves (Hayes 483). Some of the exiles may have actually had other Hebrews as slaves since the their laws allowed them to... ...esolite condition of Jerusalem they faced if they returned. These are only a few of the total possible problems and factors that affected the choice of many of the Hebrews during the Babylonian exile and immediately following during the post-exilic period. Works cited: Ackroyd, Peter, Exile and Restoration. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1968. Beasley, James R., et al., An Introduction to the Bible. Nashville: Abington Press, 1991. Blenkinsopp, Joseph, A History of Prophecy in Israel. Louisville: Westminster John   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Knox Press, 1996. Hayes, John H. and J. Maxwell Miller, ed. Israelite and Judean History. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1977. Grabbe, Lester L., The Persian and Greek Periods. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992. Vol. 1 of Judaism From Cyrus to Hadrian. 2 vols. 1992. Metzger, Bruce M., and Roland E. Murphy, ed. The New Oxford Annotated Bible. New York: Oxford University Press, Inc., 1994. Newsome, James D., By the Waters of Babylon. Atlanta: John Knox Press, 1979. Smith, Daniel L., The Religion of the Landless. Bloomington: Meyer-Stone Books, 1989. Whitley, Charles Francis, The Exilic Age. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1975. The Hebrew Exiles In Babylon Essay -- Hebrew History Historical Exiles The Hebrew Exiles in Babylon   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  When Jerusalem fell to the conquering Babylonians in 587 BC, most of what was important to the Hebrew people was gone. They lost their holy city, the Temple was destroyed, and the Davidic monarchy ended (Beasley 221). Following the destruction of Jerusalem, the Babylonian king, Nebuchadrezzar, deported most of the population to other cities, including Babylon. These exiles remained there for about fifty years until the Persian forces, under king Cyrus, took the city of Babylon in 539 BC. The Persian policies concerning captured and exiled peoples were quite different than those of the Babylonians, and because of this King Cyrus allowed the exiles to return to Jerusalem in 538 BC to rebuild the city and the Temple. However, even though the exiles were allowed to return to their ancestral homeland of Judah, many of the people chose not to return but to remain in the recently conquered city of Babylon. There are many contributing factors concerning why these Hebrew exiles chose to remain. Even so, it is difficult to understand why a people, who were located in Palestine for over a millennium and who had such strong religious beliefs and practices, would choose to abandon the location of their now destroyed sacred Temple and ancestral home after being exiled for only fifty years. One contributing factor for the exile’s choice to remain in Babylon was the quality and level of social life that they experienced while in Babylon. Many of them maintained their identity and status within the Babylonian settlements. This suggests a well-developed social structure among the Hebrew exiles (Blenkinsopp 152). They also had the benefit of personal freedom and the ability to manage their own community life. An example of this are the â€Å"elders of the diaspora†, who aided the leader of the exiles, ex-king Jehoiachin, in conducting community affairs. The presence of elders among the Hebrew exiles suggests that the settlements within Babylon governed themselves similarly to pre-exilic urban existence, even to the point of maintaining gatherings for decisions and the hearing of prophets (Smith 97). The exiles were also allowed to live according to their own customs, were able to purchase property, and could even own slaves (Hayes 483). Some of the exiles may have actually had other Hebrews as slaves since the their laws allowed them to... ...esolite condition of Jerusalem they faced if they returned. These are only a few of the total possible problems and factors that affected the choice of many of the Hebrews during the Babylonian exile and immediately following during the post-exilic period. Works cited: Ackroyd, Peter, Exile and Restoration. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1968. Beasley, James R., et al., An Introduction to the Bible. Nashville: Abington Press, 1991. Blenkinsopp, Joseph, A History of Prophecy in Israel. Louisville: Westminster John   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Knox Press, 1996. Hayes, John H. and J. Maxwell Miller, ed. Israelite and Judean History. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1977. Grabbe, Lester L., The Persian and Greek Periods. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992. Vol. 1 of Judaism From Cyrus to Hadrian. 2 vols. 1992. Metzger, Bruce M., and Roland E. Murphy, ed. The New Oxford Annotated Bible. New York: Oxford University Press, Inc., 1994. Newsome, James D., By the Waters of Babylon. Atlanta: John Knox Press, 1979. Smith, Daniel L., The Religion of the Landless. Bloomington: Meyer-Stone Books, 1989. Whitley, Charles Francis, The Exilic Age. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1975.

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Interpersonal Communications: Concept Analysis Paper

Katie Latimer November 1st, 2012 COMM 218 Concept Application Paper Communication takes place in any and all locations, intentionally and unintentionally, and it can be positive or negative. Many of our personal traits and character qualities can affect how we communicate with other people, and how they communicate with us. Recently, I had an experience that further proved this point to me in a very real and tangible way. Growing up, I have been known as levelheaded and optimistic. I don’t let a lot of distractions or emotions change or affect the way I act around others.As an athlete, my coaches always knew that if they called me into a game I would handle the pressure and play to the best of my ability, so I decided to change that about myself for a day. The night before my â€Å"experiment†, I somehow ended up in a fight with my parents, (not purposefully, of course) which really set the stage. The next morning I woke up with a negative outlook on the day, the though ts of our fight playing over in my head. I went to school, and no one talked to me, which hasn’t happened since my first day of classes, and even then I felt like people were more convivial with me.I think that because I woke up thinking that it was going to be an awful day, I made choices and acted in ways that made that idea come to fruition. This is called â€Å"self-fulfilling prophecy†. According to Alder, Rosenfeld & Proctor (2013), â€Å"A self-fulfilling prophecy occurs when a person’s expectations of an event, and her or his subsequent behavior based on those expectations, make the outcome more likely to occur than would otherwise have been true. (p. 74)† At school, because of my sour disposition and gloomy temperament, I was ignored.Not one person talked to me throughout my three classes that day. It was really quite discouraging. I believe this is because in our culture, we learn (or at least I did) that someone who doesn’t look like the y want to be talked to, doesn’t want to be talked to. Throughout the day I found myself looking around at the pretty, smiling girls and feeling very inadequate. I realize now, what I was feeling was a result of social comparison. According to Alder, Rosenfeld & Proctor (2013), social comparison is â€Å"†¦evaluating ourselves in terms of how we compare with others.We decide whether we are superior or inferior and similar or different by comparing ourselves to what social scientists call reference groups†¦ † (p. 69). Social comparison, in this instance, brought upon feelings of inferiority, as I was displaying undesirable qualities. After a very disheartening day at class, I went home. By the time my mom came home, my attitude had worsened. First she asked me â€Å"What happened? †. I responded by saying, â€Å"Nothing, I’m fine. † Which she took literally, by the content of my words, when I was hoping that she would take them in a relatio nal sense and see that I wasn’t really â€Å"fine†.In this instance, my mother was hearing my words in a contextual form, so when I said, â€Å"I’m fine. †, she heard me saying that I was okay and nothing was wrong. If she had realized that I was communicating with her relationally, she could have been able to tell by the tone of my voice and my non-verbal communications that I was not really â€Å"fine†. At the end of this very long day, I saw my boyfriend. While I am more open with him than I am with other people, I know that he still sees me as a smiling, level-headed person.Somehow he immediately knew that something was wrong. I decided to self-disclose to him, and tell him what was wrong. I told him about the fight between my parents and I, and I believe that my self-disclosure in this instance was more beneficial than risky. He also encouraged me to change my attitude and be more positive, and I believe his words had a more profound effect on me because he is literally a â€Å"significant other†. In every relationship, we can choose what to reveal about ourselves to other people.This is called â€Å"self-disclosure† and it is described as â€Å"The process of deliberately revealing information about oneself that is significant and that would normally not be known by others. (p. G-11)† In this instance, my boyfriend would not have known why I was upset, he would only have known that I was upset. When self-disclosing, honesty is of the utmost importance. If you aren’t honest in your communication, then you aren’t truly communicating. I learned a lot about communication, and I realized that I actually changed my self-concept unintentionally for 24 hours.On that day, I walked around campus feeling as if not one person wanted to converse with me, which was incredibly hard. I also learned that you could never be sure why some people are unfriendly; they may just be having a bad day. I believ e that on that day I relinquished some of the power of my identity management. Never before had I let myself be seen as shy or unfriendly, my presenting self was always approachable and helpful. The presenting self is â€Å"†¦the way we want to appear to others. In most cases the presenting self we seek to create is a socially approved image: diligent student, loyal friend, loving partner, and so on. p. 78)†. I believe that it was a good experience; I let go of my presenting or public self and was able to see more clearly how it changed my communication methods and the way others communicated with me. I also believe that it left me with the knowledge of how to better communicate with people that appear unfriendly or closed off, because you never know, they may just be having â€Å"one of those days†. References Adler, R. B. , Rosenfeld, L. B. , & Proctor, R. F. (2004). Interplay: The process of interpersonal communication. New York: Oxford University Press.

Monday, September 16, 2019

“Edward Scissorhands” by Tim Burton Essay

What type of and what journeys are undertaken in the film Edward Scissor hands by Tim Burton? The movie takes place in an entirely artificial world, where a Gothic castle crouches on a mountain top high above a story book suburb with a goofy neighbourhood where all of the houses are shades of pastels and all of the inhabitants seem to be emotional clones of the jetsons. Edward’s Journey The main character, Edward goes on a major journey. From the beginning of the film we see scenes depicting how it feels if you are different and are amongst people who fit neatly into societies accepted roles. Edward is looking for love and understanding, which is something that you long for. He has been taken from his comfort zone to a more populated and somewhat scary environment. Edwards journey is learning how to trust, and how to fully understand that people with differences are sometimes better off alone. Taken from his comfort zone and being put into a busy and noisy neighbourhood, Edward realises that there is going to be major changes in his life in order for him to adapt to his new environment and new ways of living. He is an outcast, trying to find his place in a world in which he does not belong. He has significant differences in his appearance to the everyday person with 5 fingers and toes, instead he has sharp scissors as hands and an ashen white complexion. Burton uses this as a prop for discrimination, and that’s exactly what Edward gets. He knows he is different physically but wants to show people that he can love and he does have feelings and its whats on the inside of a person that really counts, and this is what Kim saw in Edward. Whilst Edward helps Pegg chop the lettuce for the barbeque, he see’s Pegg open a can of bettroot. He experiences a flash back that takes the ausience on a journey through an old lab or factory. The inventorappears and marvels at his cookie machine. He picks up a cookie in the shape of a heart and  holds it up to the chest of a robbot that has scissors for hands and is chopping lettuce. This shows Edwards inner journey so far, having been giving feelings and a heart. Burton gives the suggestionthat these inner qualities are more important than hands. Edwards Inventor died before he gave Edward his hands. When Edward see’s a photo of Kim his eyes light up with intense feelings. Upon meeting Kim, it was evident that their would be a connection between the two characters, and a romantic journey would soon be on the way. Kim’s Journey Kim is Pegg Boggs daughter who is going out with a dead beat called Jim. Kim acted as most teenagers would if they came home to find that there was a strange young man with scissors for hands sleeping in their bed. At first she makes fun of Edward and uses him unwillingly to break into her obnoxious boyfriend’s house. Soon after this event Kim begins to see Edwards beauty and uniqueness in comparison to the people she is surrounded by everyday. Kim goes on a an inner journey of self discovery and learns a valuable lesson of life in general, that being that it doesn’t matter if the person is back white or blue you accept them for who they are on the inside, and that’s all that matters. She has full acceptance of differences and believes in Edward. The Community However the Neighbourhood’s journey is motivated by how they can use Edward Physically. They learn to accept him because he can be useful to them. At First they were unsure, but when they saw him as an object for their own fulfilment, they were quick to accept his peculiar yet useful appearance There is one character in the film who lives next door to the Boggs family, She is a very religious women and tries to get the neighbourhood to watch out for Edward, and that he is a message sent from Satan, and he is no good.  At First this didn’t seem to worry the neighbourhood, but perhaps on the inside they were very cautious of his difference to the norm society. But not everyone shares sypathethies and some bad guys are determined to abuse the naive and innocent Edward. Suddenly, after the burglary, rumours spread like wildfire and suddenly once again, everyone is staying away from the lonely young man. Yet only Kim has faith What Obstacles or challenges do some of the characters undergo or face during their journeys. Edward The first challenge or obstacle for Edward is really at the beginning of the film when he is in the car with Pegg. It is obvious that Edward has never been outside his castle, he is fascinated by the surroundings of the town, he tries to look closer but hits his head on the window, not realising its their. It is soon recognised by the viewer just how much Edward has been out of contact with the rest of the world, something that would soon be changing. Dealing with the fact that his inventor died Edward was forced to move on with his life living totally by himself with scissors for hands and no real friends. He had to live with the fact that he was an invention that was never quite finished and he would never change, a task within itself being hard to deal with. This for him would have been hard to deal with but he used his time sculpting plants into animals and maintaining a beautiful garden, whilst in the winter when it would snow, Edward would carve ice sculptures with his gift and talent using his scissors. Edward has to face the community at a big neighbourhood barbecue where he is confronted with many different people and their attitudes. He was put on the spot to see all of these people with normal lives compared to him only meeting one person in his life†¦and that being his inventor, Edward only ever knew one other human, so meeting new people was quiet a large task for him. He had to watch the girl that he was falling in love with, get tormented by her boyfriend, but did things for her that were morally wrong, but did it out of the goodness of his heart. Edward knows that Jim is not good for Kim, but doesn’t try to stop her from being with him, instead he uses his somewhat peculiar charm to win her over, which he himself never thought was possible. Another challenge that Edward faces is that of which when he is confronted by Pegg Boggs at the start of the film. She decides to go to the castle, where no one else has ever been just to see if she could sell some Avon. She finds Edward and her first impression is that she tries to leave†¦but he says, † wait†. She stops, looks at him, and then applies some treatment to his face. He is scared when she touches him, but then just stands there. Its this trusts that started Edward on his journey to believing in others. Eating dinner was another challenge Edward faced at the dinner table. Everyone would watch as he tries to grasp a pea in the clamp of the scissors but no success. It would be even harder with Kevin (Kim’s brother) watching him all the time. It made him feel different and in a sense not included. Poor Edward yet again was made to feel as an individual. Kim When Edward first arrived Kim was not too sure about him, and her boyfriend didn’t like him either. She would go out with her boyfriend and come home and look at Edward, on the inside she knew she liked him, but didn’t know if it was physically possible. She was faced with a serious challenge when her boyfriend asked her to get Edward to join into the robbery. She knew it was morally wrong but did it to keep her boyfriend happy. Yet when Edward gets stuck inside the house, Kim try’s to get Jim to help but Jim is so obnoxious he quickly drives away. She knows in her heart that she needs to get Edward out, and knows he is scared. However the next day, when Edward gets home from gaol, He says that he did  not dob her in, and when she asks why he says that † I did it because you asked me to†. So Kim really feels for Edward, he has a gentle spirit, and it is clearly portrayed through his personality. What Discoveries or changes are made? Edward One of Edwards’s major discoveries is just how different he is compared to the rest of neighbourhood and society. When he actually gets out and sees’s what life is like outside his own home, he discovers that he is the only one with such a significant difference. And discovers that people with such physical differences are often discriminated against for being unique in there own personal way. Although this makes him upset, he chooses for it not to affect him. The neighbourhood accepts him in a perverse and freakish way, the people seeing him as a curiosity. He soon becomes popular for his gift of cutting hedges into pieces of beautiful art and arousing the dormant passions of spiteful housewives. Kim Kim discovers that it doesn’t matter what a person looks like, or what they do in their life, its what they have on the inside that counts. Edward has a pure gentle and kind heart and is willing to love her with all his soul. She realises that a persons emotions build their character more than their handsome looks. By the end of the Film, when she pretends Edward has died, On the inside Kim knows that there has been a spiritual change in her life. She no longer judges people by their appearance, but furthermore the content of their character. What techniques does the composer use to convey meaning? And what are the effects of those techniques? Tim Burton has always been a guarantor for visionary movie making a very strong visually driven direction. This style makes him a very  distinguishable director but at the same time makes him very unique as well. Burton always gives the material a spin that is unique and interesting, no matter how banal the subject may appear at first. With this film, however, he created a romantic drama with serious undertones, very serious and dark, to the point that the film’s opening almost plays like a classic horror film. Successful satire has to have a place to stand, and a target to aim at. The entire world of Edward Scissorhands is satire, and so, Edward inhabits it, rather than taking an aim at it. Even if he lived in a more hospitable world, however, it is hard to tell what satirical comment Edward would have to make, because the movie makes an abrupt switch in his character about two thirds of the way through. Until then he has been a gentle goofy soul, a quixotic outsider. Like all good fairy-tale fables, this one has a moral. People who are different are going to have a difficult time in this world. It’s an easy moral for almost anybody to relate to since almost everybody has felt different at one time or another, especially in one’s youth. What teenager hasn’t longed to be the Student Body President, the quarterback of the football team, the captain of the cheerleading squad, the straight-A scholar, the popular, gorgeous or handsome kid as the case may be, instead of the middling nerd, the undesirable, the social reject we’ve sometimes felt we were? But for Burton that isn’t enough. He also piles on layers of slight, superficial satire. He pokes fun at middle-class suburban living middle-class values, small-town hypocrisy, small-mindedness, gossiping, and backbiting. One of the most striking aspects of the film is its visual style. From the character of Edward, to the looming castle and the peculiar small town suburbia, everything is stylised to extremes. The neighbourhoods are all painted in bright pastel colours with houses that are as uniform as the attitudes of its inhabitants, and Edwards’s artistry only furthers the impression of a completely artificial world. His trademark use of miniatures is in full force with the long shots of the town and mansion. His camera work is smooth and flowing, and the film has a wonderful sense of humour The film certainly does not fall flat of a narrative even though all its focus is on the visuals. Although since it is a rather traditional outsider story, told in a very different way one could argue the plot is rather predictable. The presentation, the pacing and emotional impact created by the film is just as powerful and makes â€Å"Edward Scissorhands† a beautifully enchanting modern day fairy tale with a social subtext. It has a somewhat cyclic nature. Flash backs show Edwards inner journey. In one particular flashback Edward sees his inventor contemplating giving Edward feelings and emotions with significance to a heart shaped cookie. It’s in this flash back that suggests these inner qualities are more important than hands. The colour of these flash backs being black and white play a significant part in the movie. The black and white tones of these flashbacks emphasises the time change of the rather dark idea of a person being constructed scientifically, but still the most important part is his feelings. There are many shots where misenscene’s are used. Like when Kim and Edward hug. This frame shows them in a close up, emphasising this new love The whole film indicates an inner journey is taking place from the establishment shots in which the camera pans over the mountain and the village indicating to the audience of the unique contrast. The music used by Danny Elfman compliments every shot made. From the beginning when the camera pans over the mountain there is heavy tones of dark mysterious music, but when then put to contrast to the neighbourhood there is soft calm music and birds chirping. Its these contrast that help set the scenes in the film. Edward Scissorhands presents this outlandishly strange premise, but with a gentleness worthy of Edward himself, Burton demonstrates how Edward is just an extreme metaphor for the gangliness and isolation experienced by most  adolescents. Kim is a popular beauty-queen among her school set, but she isn’t any happier than Edward is. Besides, she doesn’t even seem to have a special trait or reliably unique skill, at least her new brother of sorts can cut hair, clip hedges, and provide excellent show-and-tell material for her younger brother. The film opens with a loving grandmother offering to explain to her adorable granddaughter where snow comes from, and then turns into a dark and disturbing parable of loneliness, nonconformity, and the tyranny of small minds. Edward Scissorhands, is a deeply touching movie, it isn’t overtly a Christmas movie, but it does touch on the grimmer side of the religion that currently dominates the much more ancient tradition of a midwinter celebration. The appropriately over-the-top performances from much of the cast and the overly bright fakeness of the world their characters inhabit might make it easy for some to dismiss Edward Scissorhands as fluff fantasy with nothing of importance to offer, but Johnny Depp won’t let that happen. Regardless of the oddity of his character, Depp keeps the film rooted in reality — whatever motive you attribute to the neighbours, the profound affect that their mass rejection of Edward has on him is undeniably, recognisably true. Edward is heartbreakingly poignant. His sudden rage, which he expresses by ripping his scissors across wallpaper and drapes, is all the more startling because he has been so courteous with his sharp edges before. His â€Å"fingers† snap and twitch when he’s nervous, which is often — not equipped with the verbal skills to defend himself, his despair radiates wordlessly. Even Edward’s humorous moments — as when he encounters the one piece of furniture to which he’s a serious danger: a waterbed — Depp imbues with a touch of pathos. How does â€Å"Edward Scissorhands† relate to the core text â€Å"My Place†? Pegg Boggs and Sally Morgan share a similar personality trait. Both characters have big hearts and kind souls. In â€Å"Edward Scissorhands† Pegg strives to help Edward deal with his differences. Just like Sally who tries  to get her grandmother to talk and accept her true identity. Both characters try to get their close ones to accept themselves for who they are, and to know that its what’s on the inside of a person that really matters, not what they look like. Sally excepts that Nan has been brought up in a different era and accepts this different, just like Pegg accepts Edward and his situation. However â€Å"My Place† and â€Å"Edward Scissorhands† involve completely different journeys in the sense that Morgan’s is a true account and autobiography of her real family and Tim Burtons film is a fantasy. This contrast shows that scissors for hands is a symbol illustration that is used to point out the discrimination felt by people who are actually physically different, just like Nan and Gladys who were discriminated against for their aboriginality. After Edward’s inventor died, he stayed living in the big house alone. This hiding away is parallel to Nan and Gladys hiding their Aboriginality. However both Sally and Pegg bring out the inner beauty of these people with differences and give them the sense of security and reassurance that they were both once unable to feel.